What’s Your Score, Baby?

If you have a high Klout (score), people will notice you. When they notice you, they’ll talk about you. When they talk about you, people walk in. Therefore, seeking out ways to genuinely increase your Klout …score is a valid social media strategy.  Brian Ambrozy

I just started using Klout about two months ago, and while I’m not sure how strong my score is or how effective my internet presence is, I know that Klout has helped me with one thing. More on that one thing later. (By the way, at this moment, my score is 50.) Oh, and the other thing about Klout is that it is the word Clout spelled with a ‘K’, so you know it’s clever.

Klout is an online services that takes your Facebook and Twitter (and now LinkedIn) accounts and measures the strength and size of your reach.  They do this by calculating 35 different variables and distill the data to come up with three measurements: True Reach, Amplification Probability and Network Influence.

I’m not a social media genius, so I have no idea what those mean, but I am guessing a few things. True Reach, I would venture to say, means how many people you actually interact with…not just how many followers or fans you have.  I’m hearing a lot about social media gaming, or manipulating the networks to work to your advantage without actually doing the real networking. There are so many companies (not individuals) that have joined the scene, and many of them have several different accounts…and some even sell these accounts to people who want to “get 10,000 followers”. Well, from what I understand, Klout manages to see which of these followers are actually real followers who actively engage with you. (I’m starting to feel like we’re in the movie Minority Report.)

Amplification Probability also sounds fairly self-explanatory. I’m guessing it is a measurement of how many times your message gets reposted or retweeted. How likely is your message or conversation to be spread around? This is also a way to separate the internet robots from the real people.

And Network Influence? I am going to take a stab at this and say it has to do with how influential your actual friends or followers are. Do you have followers who have other real followers and who engage regularly, or are your followers simple “voyeurs”, as YouTube likes to call it’s non-members.

What is nice about Klout is that it gives you a fairly realistic measurement of your online engagement and presence.  The one thing I really like about Klout (and the reason I am spending any time writing about it) is that it helps me to feel as if I’m actually getting somewhere with my social networking.  If you are like me, every morning you wake up and turn on Facebook and Twitter.  You check your messages, see how many followers you have, and start doing the deal.  It feels kind of like Groundhog Day.  Until there was Klout, I always felt like I was typing and clicking in the dark. Now I am developing a strategy, of sorts.  I know that according to Klout I need to engage…so I make a valiant attempt to do that with my friends and followers.  I also actively seek new people to follow, and I try to stay in my lane.  I can even use Klout to engage with my Twitter followers because Klout lets me give people K+ awards (letting people know they influence me in a certain category or field).

If you are like me, and just starting to find your way in the social networking realm, give Klout a try.  It might really prove to be a big help.


Comments

  1. Thanks for the mention! I think you hit the nail on the head with your statement about Klout helping you to develop a strategy. Even if Klout is not the end-all, be-all service that will measure this stuff down the road, it did start the conversation and help focus efforts.

  2. My Klout is 59 office-mate… I have watched your Klout go up up up since you have been blogging every day in the 30 day blog challenge. What a summer huh? so much blogging, tweeting, and connecting. I am exhausted! How about you?

  3. Look at you go! I’ve been naughty! My Klout has fallen 5 points in the past two weeks. I’ve got to get back on my “A” Twitter game. ;)

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